1.16.2011

Nina Simonds' Scallion Pancakes


I've been hearing about scallion pancakes for ages, have enjoyed them countless times, read a while back about them on Dorie Greenspan's blog and have always wanted to make them at home. But this is one of those recipes I kept putting off as I knew it would take an entire afternoon after reading Dorie's comment about patience.


When I think of Chinese cooking, breads don't usually come to mind. But of course, they do make breads...for one, think of steamed pork buns.....and another, these scallion pancakes. They are a unique flatbread in that they are pan-fried, but made from a dough that's kneaded and shaped rather than  poured. You don't use a wok, you use a non-stick skillet for frying. 


Beause I have a copy of A Spoonful of Ginger, I went to the original recipe and finally spent a rainy afternoon making them. If you're going to give them a try (and oh so worth it) read through the recipe carefully; it's not that they're hard, they're not. Easy as pie actually, using simple ingredients you probably have in your kitchen right now. It's just 
there's a lot of resting between steps and you want to allow time. And once you have your little patties, you can refrigerate or freeze them for future use.

Flaky Scallion Pancakes
From A Spoonful of Ginger by Nina Simonds


Ingredients:

3 cups cake flour

1/2 cup all-purpose flour
1 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons corn oil
1 3/4 cups boiling water
1/4 cup or more all-purpose flour, if necessary, for kneading
1/4 cup toasted sesame oil
3/4 cup minced scallion greens
3/4 cup canola or corn oil

Method:


Stir the flours and salt in a mixing bowl with a wooden spoon.  Add the corn oil and the boiling water, and stir until a rough dough forms.  If the dough is too soft, knead in about 1/4 cup more flour.  Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured surface and knead for 5 minutes, or until smooth, kneading in more all-purpose flour as necessary.  Cover with a cloth or wrap in plastic and let rest for 30 minutes, or longer if possible.

On a very lightly floured work surface, roll the dough into a long snakelike roll about 1 inch in diameter.  Cut the roll into 24 pieces.  Keep the unused dough covered with a damp towel as you work.

With a rolling pin, roll out one piece of dough, cut side down on the work surface, into a 5-inch circle.  Brush the top with a little sesame oil and sprinkle with some of the minced scallion greens.




Roll up the circle like a jelly roll and pinch the ends to seal.  Flatten the roll slightly with the rolling pin, and coil it into a snail shape, with the seam on the inside.  Pinch the end to secure it and set aside on a lightly floured surface.  Prepare the remaining pancakes, and let them rest for 30 minutes uncovered.



Reflour the work surface and roll each coiled pancake out to a 4-inch circle.  Place them on a lightly floured tray.  Let them rest for 30 minutes uncovered, or longer if possible.  Preheat the oven to 200 degrees F.

Heat a large, heavy skillet, add the oil, and heat to 350 degrees F.  Put a few of the pancakes in the pan, not touching, and fry over medium heat, turning once, until golden brown and crisp on both sides, about 2 to 3 minutes.  Remove with a spatula and drain briefly in a colander, then transfer to absorbent paper.  Arrange the cooked pancakes on a cookie sheet and keep them warm in the oven while you fry the remaining pancakes, reheating the oil between batches.  Serve immediately or keep warm in the oven.
Makes 24 pancakes.

Serve with dipping sauce of soy sauce, rice vinegar, sugar, and sesame oil:

General Dipping Sauce for Japanese Gyoza, Scallion Pancakes (or just about anything)

Ingredients:
2 parts soy sauce
1 part rice wine vinegar
½ part sesame oil or chili sesame oil
1 part sugar (optional)

Method:
Combine ingredients and serve. 

74 comments:

  1. What a lovely photo of the pancakes Barbara. Thanks for the tip about the reading the recipe thoroughly and noting the resting time. I don't like to admit it, but I'm a recipe skimmer and always get in trouble with resting times that I didn't anticipate. Don't tell on me - let this be our little secret. (smile)
    Sam

    ReplyDelete
  2. Wowza These look great Barbara! It does seem to be quite a process but looks well worth it.

    ReplyDelete
  3. I read through the recipe from start to finish Barbara and am intrigued. It dies take time but everyone seems to love these gems.

    ReplyDelete
  4. I adore the scallion pancakes! They are so good with a bowl of hot veggie soup!

    ReplyDelete
  5. I made some in a similar recipe last year; be prepared for squishing noises from the scallions in the final dough roll out but it is so worth it with the end result - Yummo, especially with the sauces/s!

    ReplyDelete
  6. A wonderful speciality! Your pancakes look perfect, beautiful and so tasty.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

    ReplyDelete
  7. Dorie Greenspan has a blog? Have to go subscribe. I'd love to learn how to make those buns. I recently had them at a restaurant and have found a recipe. Now, for these pancakes...beautiful Barbara! What a nice job and they look perfectly delicious. I'd be pretty proud if I were you.

    ReplyDelete
  8. This is the exact way we make Kulchas or stuffed Naans in India, Barbara. The savory pancakes do look soft and flaky.

    ReplyDelete
  9. I love scallion pancakes! I've never made them myself but I always seem to have scallions in the fridge, so I really should learn how to make them! These look delicious.

    ReplyDelete
  10. Barbara, these are awesome! They look just like the scallion pancakes and breads I used to get at restaurants on Buford Highway in Atlanta (the Asian sector). I'm saving these to my files:-)

    ReplyDelete
  11. When I saw that the post was for scallion pancakes I was skeptical, but then I saw the photo and I was sold. They look great

    ReplyDelete
  12. That's not so much work, Barbara. I love scallion pancakes when they are good and making them with this recipe would insure that... and be fresh too. I am just starting to explore Chinese cuisine again (and got my first bottle of Shaoxing wine after all these years of using sherry) I look forward to a lot of interesting food..... thanks for your addition!

    ReplyDelete
  13. They look lovely, but the Knight would NEVER eat them; he hates scallions. Sigh.

    ReplyDelete
  14. I would love to make these pancakes at home. What a treat. Thanks for the tip about the time needed for this recipe. I probably would have plunged in without noticing. This is a good recipe for a winter afternoon at home.

    ReplyDelete
  15. Love the look and sound of these pancakes, thanks for another super recipe.

    ReplyDelete
  16. steamed pork buns and scallion pancakes - both are right at the top of the list for 'things i really love!' more often than i care to admit, i too skim recipes thinking i know the lay of the land and then - WHAM! a resting time i hadn't anticipated now means that some part of the meal will be served late . . . i'm going to make these Barbara!

    ReplyDelete
  17. I have never made scallion pancakes before. Yours look lovely, and what a beautiful photo. I don't think I had the time to wait, like you said. A rainy afternoon sounds like a perfect time to try it.

    P.S. Sam, your secret is safe with us! shhhh...;)

    ReplyDelete
  18. This is my kinda recipe Barbara as I love salty pancakes and scallions too. So simple but comforting. Yours look just perfect.

    ReplyDelete
  19. Yeah, me too, I've seen these on so many blogs and I so want to make them. I can tell they would be absolutely delicious. Do you think I could make this with all purpose flour? You cant get cake flour in the UK.
    *kisses* HH

    ReplyDelete
  20. They are gorgeous..and you have presented them so well!

    Thank you.

    ReplyDelete
  21. I've been dying to make these little beauties since I first saw them a couple years ago. Yours look wonderful, Barbara, and now I am even more inspired to try my hand at them!

    ReplyDelete
  22. From the looks of them, they were sure worth the time you spent making them. They are perfect.

    ReplyDelete
  23. Barbara, these scallion pancakes look delightful. Served up with the dipping sauce just brings this to a new level. Awesome.

    Velva

    ReplyDelete
  24. They look and sound so worth the patience, Barbara! I've yet to make scallion pancakes myself. They must be wonderful dipped in that sauce!

    ReplyDelete
  25. WOW..these look and sound simply amazing. These would make a fabulous dinner side dish I think.

    ReplyDelete
  26. Barbara these pancakes are adorables, look yummy and nice! gloria

    ReplyDelete
  27. these are gorgeous, i love how they look like they would just melt in your mouth. lovely!

    ReplyDelete
  28. My family loves this. We make quite often. Great as a snack or even for a light meal. Yours look perfect.

    ReplyDelete
  29. I've never had one, Barbara. I'm a lazy baker. Let's see how well they travel? :)
    ~ingrid

    ReplyDelete
  30. I bet these are amazing...would so love to try them. Thanks for sharing the goodness with us all. oxxoxo

    ReplyDelete
  31. Well done Barbara. I love scallion pancakes, and you're right, they aren't too tricky to make. Like you, I took a long time to get around to making them, but so glad I did. You made your own dipping sauce too! Yum.

    ReplyDelete
  32. I"m sure your patience paid off! They sound wonderful! Thanks!

    ReplyDelete
  33. This sounds like a delicious way to spend a winter's afternoon--with reading and sipping tea in between steps!

    Best,
    Bonnie

    ReplyDelete
  34. Heavens, who knew the work that went into those suckers? I love eating them, though, I must admit. My neighbor makes them but I have to say, yours look better!

    ReplyDelete
  35. These look fantastic! What a treat! I would love them, especially with that dipping sauce!

    ReplyDelete
  36. Dearest Barbara,

    My goodness, these look so great and remind me of the shrimp cakes my mom used to make with scallions! She made the mildest, most delicate red sauce for them...holy cow, back in time here...thank you for coming to visit me today! Oh that we could live in the moment always, non? And to write well, oh to have the time!!!

    May your week be happy and full of love, Anita

    ReplyDelete
  37. It's like an omelette in bread form! How neat!

    ReplyDelete
  38. These look delicious, Barbara. Believe it or not, scallions are kind of hard to find in France--a trip to the Asian supermarket is in the works to try this recipe out!

    ReplyDelete
  39. wow these look great love learning new recipes

    ReplyDelete
  40. These look like Green Onion Cakes - but without the lard!
    I cannot wait to try them. I don't mind the waiting steps and the length on days I am home - and I trust you on "they are so worth it". The LOOK incredible. And I love that the dough can be frozen.
    :)
    valerie

    ReplyDelete
  41. These look fabulous Barbara and just like the ones that we order at the restaurant!

    ReplyDelete
  42. These look great! So packed with flavor...yum!

    Can you deliver to NY :)

    ReplyDelete
  43. I bet these are incredible. I love scallion pancakes. Making them at home is such a better alternative, too, to the usual grease-bomb ones found at restaurants.

    ReplyDelete
  44. Oh Barbara, I love this pancakes...and haven't had this for a long time...have to make them soon...yours turned out perfect :-)

    ReplyDelete
  45. Those scallion pancakes look perfectly delicious! Great step by step pictures!

    ReplyDelete
  46. Now I'm seriously tempted. You make it look doable, borderline easy.

    ReplyDelete
  47. Barbara, these look delicious! I'm going to have to figure out how to make them without wheat... I'll keep you posted.

    Thanks for posting these.

    ReplyDelete
  48. Barbara, these do look very tempting.
    I personally have to confess to short term impatience...however, I do find my patience when something is worthwhile ;o)

    Flavourful wishes,
    Claudia

    ReplyDelete
  49. I read ur intro and thought , now way , i cant make these , but ur pics make it seems so easy , i mean u give me the push to try!
    And i must !
    U have done a wonderful job and i so wish i could have a few of these:-)
    Happy day pal:-)

    ReplyDelete
  50. Barbara, I had no idea of the time involved in making these Chinese pancakes---but, like many things with flour, the trick is patience. These look terrific, and I love the recipe for the dipping sauce---great ratios.

    ReplyDelete
  51. yummy! This is like the way Koreans make savory pancakes. yummy!

    ReplyDelete
  52. These are delicious looking.

    ReplyDelete
  53. Barbara, you've featured one of my favorite snacks. I've never tried this recipe but I'll remedy that the next time we have a yen for scallion pancakes. Yours look and sound delicious. Have a wonderful day. Blessings...Mary

    ReplyDelete
  54. Very impressed that you made these!!! They look SO worth it! Kinda makes me look forward to the next rainy day at home so I can take on a food project too... They look delicious!

    ReplyDelete
  55. I love the step by step photos that I can follow to make these pancakes. They do look delicious. Bookmarked!

    ReplyDelete
  56. These are definitely a labor of love. The more you knead, the chewier the pancakes are, which is a prized quality of these savory Asian pancakes. They are oh so good hot and fresh! This looks like an excellent recipe.

    ReplyDelete
  57. very nice, barbara! i've seen these on several blogs and have always been interested in trying them, but i haven't seemed to get around to it. excuses, excuses, i know. :)

    ReplyDelete
  58. These look absolutely wonderful! I'm bookmarking this just in case I have the perfect afternoon to make them. Gorgeous photo!

    ReplyDelete
  59. I've always wanted to make these Barbara! Thanks for showing us how! They look wonderful.

    ReplyDelete
  60. This is my first time here, came from LC. I am still exploring your blog, i love your post on pancakes. great pictures and this is how we make kulchas- a kind of flat bread in India. It goes very well with Indian curry too , the only diff we do not use cake flour but just allpurpose.

    ReplyDelete
  61. This is the first time I've seen scallion pancakes. I guess I'd better try some out. They look wonderful.

    ReplyDelete
  62. Scallion pancakes are my only must-order item when getting Chinese food! I made them a couple years ago, but yours look so much better. I think I need to try them again :)

    Sues

    ReplyDelete
  63. These look like a labor of love. I wish someone would make them for me!

    ReplyDelete
  64. I love scallion pancakes, but have never attempted to make them. You make them look so easy and delicious.
    Mimi

    ReplyDelete
  65. I wouldn't be able to resist these especially with that lovely sounding dipping sauce.

    ReplyDelete
  66. oh yum!!!! I love your pictures, they are great!! You explain everything so well Barbara! This recipe is well worth a little extra work..looks incredible!
    xx
    Bunny
    PS...I agree with you on the 'orchids' I love them and use them a lot throughout my home they are much more economical and last for months...tomorrow I'm heading out to pick up a couple more..
    Have a great week!!

    ReplyDelete
  67. I love scallion pancakes! Yours look authentic and YUM!

    ReplyDelete
  68. Oh my, Barbara is doing Chinese cooking today! I've seen loads of blogger making this yummy snack. You made it sounds so inviting. Guess, I should make some too. :o) Have a great day.
    Cheers, Kristy

    ReplyDelete
  69. I have been wanting to make these Chinese scallion pancake for years too! Now I know that I have no more excuses, the recipe is right here, and clear as crystal!

    ReplyDelete
  70. Cake flour! Interesting!

    I've been baking a lot of breads lately. We love naan, and my girls love scallions. Viola! This looks like the perfect combination. I absolutely MUST try this. Thanks!

    ReplyDelete

What do you think?

LinkWithin

Related Posts with Thumbnails